Academic staff

Thibaut QUILLARD

Associate Professor (INSERM CRCN)

Contact details

Faculté de Médecine - salle 311 1 rue Gaston Veil 44035 Nantes cedex 1

Phone
02-40-41-28-46
Fax
02-40-41-28-60
Email
Thibaut.Quillard@univ-nantes.fr

Research topics

vascular calcification, atherosclerosis, arterial heterogeneity

Activities / Resume

2014 - present: Postdoctoral fellow, INSERM UMR957 LPRO
Comparative Study And Mechanisms Of Calcication Heterogeneity in Atherosclerotic Plaques
with Pr. Dominique Heymann and Pr. Yann Goueffic

2008-2013: Postdoctoral fellow, Brigham and Women's hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
-MMP collagenases in the development and rupture of atherosclerotic plaques
-TLR2 and Neutrophil in supercial erosion of atherosclerotic plaques
Supervised by Dr Peter Libby

2004-2008: PhD, INSERM UMR 643, Nantes, France
Involvement of Notch signaling pathway in endothelial dysfunction in Transplantation : regulation and functions of Notch2 and Notch4 receptors - Supervised by Dr Beatrice Charreau

Additional informations

Vascular calcification is among the most frequent forms of ectopic mineralization. Arterial calcification in atherosclerotic lesions has a predictive and independent correlation with cardiovascular complications and mortality. This process shares many features with bone remodeling, notably through the presence of numerous bone-related molecules and cell types in calcified arteries. We postulate that the molecular effector mechanisms implicated in this process are at least partly similar to pathological bone-forming processes, obviously with specific micro-environmental facilitators.
Different types of calcification can be found in atherosclerotic lesions, from calcium/phosphate crystals deposits to actual bone structure. Calcification heterogeneity is directly related to arterial heterogeneity depending on their anatomical location, femoral arteries being more prone to calcify and form bone-like tissue.
Thanks to our human biocollections, we have performed a transcriptomic analysis of pathological and healthy arteries from various arterial beds, to identify key molecules regulating this ossification process.
Our research aims to elucidate pathological mineralization mechanisms that could also be implicated in bone remodeling disorders, and provide new therapeutic approaches for limiting their clinical impact.